Hard scientific evidence of the effects of diet, pharmaceutical drugs & lifestyle on health from over 1,400 studies from research centers, universities and peer reviewed scientific journals.

My aim is to make this website the No: 1 worldwide go to place to access the actual scientific papers on the subjects of statins, cholesterol and saturated fat.

Research by David Evans

Friday, 22 May 2015

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics say that cholesterol and saturated fat do not cause heart disease

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) recently released the new draft dietary guidelines for Americans.

A press release from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics commented on the draft guidelines. The release contained the following:

(a) The Academy supports the DGAC in its decision to drop dietary cholesterol from the nutrients of concern list and recommends it deemphasize saturated fat from nutrients of concern, given the lack of evidence connecting it with cardiovascular disease.
(b) Low sodium intake levels recommended by the DGAC are actually associated with increased mortality for healthy individuals.
(c) The evidence is strongest that a reduction in the intake of added sugars will improve the health of the American public.

I'm glad the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics are at last coming around to my way of thinking.

Tuesday, 12 May 2015

Statins users with existing coronary artery disease have a 15% increased risk of another heart attack

This study was published in Circulation Journal 2004 Jan;68(1):47-52

Study title and authors:
Insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia are risk factors for new cardiovascular events in patients with prior coronary artery disease and normal glucose tolerance.
Yanase M, Takatsu F, Tagawa T, Kato T, Arai K, Koyasu M, Horibe H, Nomoto S, Takemoto K, Shimizu S, Watarai M.
Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Anjo Kosei Hospital, Aichi, Japan. yanase@kosei.anjo.aichi.jp

This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14695465

This study investigated risk factors for further cardiovascular event in patients with existing coronary artery disease. The study lasted three years and included 102 patients with coronary artery disease.

Regarding statins, the study found that patients who took statins had a 15% increased risk of a further cardiovascular event than patients who did not take statins.

Thursday, 7 May 2015

Statins and nasal polyps

This paper was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine 2005 Feb 15;142(4):310-1

Study title and authors:
Statins and nasal polyps.
Bucca C, Marsico A, Panaro E, Bigo P, Brussino L.

This paper can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15710970

This paper describes the case of a woman who developed nasal polyps (warty growths) after taking statins.

(i) A 57 year old woman with rhinosinusitis (rhinosinusitis is inflammation of the nasal passage and sinuses) and asthma sought medical attention for the recent onset of rhinosinusitis associated with asthma.
(ii) With treatment the patients condition nearly normalised.
(iii) She started to take atorvastatin.
(iv) One month later the patient returned because of severe persistent nasal obstruction with extensive polyp growth.
(v) Tests found she had abnormally high amounts of eosinophil's (white blood cells) and her sinuses were completely stuffed with polyps.
(vi) The polyps were removed, but returned within one month of surgery.
(vii) She stopped taking atorvastatin and within three weeks her condition had dramatically improved with her nasal polyps disappearing.
(viii) She restarted atorvastatin and her nasal symptoms and polyps returned shortly afterwards, together with nasal eosinophilia.
(ix) The patient improved after again stopping atorvastatin.
(x) She later started to take simvastatin and again the polyps recurred.

Bucca concluded: "Statins may lead to development of eosinophilic polypoid rhinosinusitis"

Friday, 1 May 2015

Statin use associated with a 17% increased risk of urinary tract symptoms

This study was published in the International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 2014 Jul 2
 
Study title and authors:
Association of statin use with storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): data mining of prescription database.
Fujimoto M, Higuchi T, Hosomi K, Takada M.
 
This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24986095

The objective of the study was to examine the association between statin use and the risk of lower urinary tract symptoms. The study analysed a large database of prescriptions of statin use in combination with drugs administered for storage lower urinary tract symptoms. (Storage lower urinary tract symptoms include increased frequency and urgency of passing urine, urge incontinence and needing to get up to pass urine at night).

The study found statin users had a 17% higher risk of storage lower urinary tract symptoms.

Fujimoto concluded: "Analysis of the prescription database showed significant association for storage LUTS (lower urinary tract symptoms) in statin users". 

Tuesday, 21 April 2015

Statins associated with an 88% increased risk of recurrence of bladder cancer

This study was published in BMC Cancer 2015 Mar 13;15:120
 
Study title and authors:
Can daily intake of aspirin and/or statins influence the behavior of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer? A retrospective study on a cohort of patients undergoing transurethral bladder resection.
Pastore A, Palleschi G, Fuschi A, Silvestri L, Al Salhi Y, Costantini E, Zucchi A, Petrozza V, de Nunzio C, Carbone A.
 
This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25877676

Transurethral  bladder resection is a surgical procedure that is used both to diagnose bladder cancer and to remove cancerous tissue from the bladder.

This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between  non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer and statins or aspirin in patients submitted to transurethral bladder resection. The study, (which included 574 patients diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer), was divided into two main groups: treated (aspirin and/or statins) and untreated.

Regarding statins, the study found that patients who took statins had a 88% increased risk of recurrence of bladder cancer compared to patients who did not take statins. 

Friday, 17 April 2015

Plant sterols might be an additional risk factor for coronary heart disease

This study was published in Metabolism 2002 Dec;51(12):1519-21

Study title and authors:
Serum plant sterols as a potential risk factor for coronary heart disease.
Sudhop T, Gottwald BM, von Bergmann K.
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12489060

The lead author of the study, Dr Thomas Sudhop, notes that in patients with the inherited disease of phytosterolemia, elevated concentrations of plant sterols (eg, campesterol and sitosterol) (think Benecol and Flora proactive) have been implicated as a risk factor for premature atherosclerosis.

This study examined the role of plant sterols in patients (with plant sterol levels in the normal range) admitted for elective artery coronary bypass graft surgery. The study included 53 patients of which 26 reported a family history in their first-degree relatives for coronary heart disease.

The study found:
(a) Patients with a positive family history for coronary heart disease had a significant 31% higher plasma levels of campesterol compared to patients without a family history of coronary heart disease.
(b) Patients with a positive family history for coronary heart disease had a significant 29% higher plasma levels of sitosterol compared to patients without a family history of coronary heart disease.
(c) Patients with a positive family history for coronary heart disease had a significantly higher ratios of sitosterol to cholesterol and campesterol to cholesterol compared to patients without a family history of coronary heart disease.

Dr Sudhop concluded: "These findings support the hypothesis that plant sterols might be an additional risk factor for coronary heart disease".

Monday, 13 April 2015

Statin users of ten years have a 30% increased risk of colorectal cancer

This study was published in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety 2008 Sep;17(9):869-76

Study title and authors:
Chronic statin therapy and the risk of colorectal cancer.
Yang YX, Hennessy S, Propert K, Hwang WT, Sarkar M, Lewis JD.
Division of Gastroenterology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021, USA. yangy@mail.med.upenn.edu

This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18412290

The study sought to clarify the association between long-term statin therapy and the risk of colorectal cancer. This study was conducted among patients aged 50 years or more and with five or more years of colorectal cancer-free initial follow-up. The study included 4,432 colorectal cancer patients and 44,292 control subjects.

The study found:
(a) Those who had been taking statins for five or more years had a 10% increased risk of colorectal cancer compared to non-users of statins.
(b) Those who had been taking statins for ten years had a 30% increased risk of colorectal cancer compared to non-users of statins.