Hard scientific evidence of the effects of diet, pharmaceutical drugs & lifestyle on health from over 1,300 studies from research centers, universities and peer reviewed scientific journals.

Research by David Evans

Monday, 7 March 2011

Low fat/high carbohydrate diets lead to an increase in (bad) cholesterol

This post includes a synopsis of a study published in The Journal of Lipid Research, 51, 3324-3330 November 2010 and a recipe for a succulent bison roast.

Study title and authors:
Changes in lipoprotein(a), oxidized phospholipids, and LDL subclasses with a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet
Nastaran Faghihnia*, Sotirios Tsimikas†, Elizabeth R. Miller†, Joseph L. Witztum† and Ronald M. Krauss*,1
*Department of Atherosclerosis Research, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA
†Department of Medicine,† University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

This paper can be accessed at: http://www.jlr.org/content/51/11/3324.abstract
                                                                                                                                            Books:
Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Vintage)The study compared the effects of 2 diets on different types of cholesterol in 63 healthy subjects over a 4 week period.

The diets were:
(i) 20% fat, 65% carbohydrate, 15% protein (low-fat, high carbohydrate diet).
(ii) 40% fat, 45% carbohydrate, 15% protein (high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet).

The study found that:
(a) The (bad) Lp(a) levels increased by 11.8% on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.
(b) The (bad) apolipoprotein (apo)B levels increased by 5.6% on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.
(c) LDL cholesterol particle size decreased to a (bad) smaller size on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.
(d) The total number of (bad) very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles increased by 24% on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.
(e) The (bad) triglyceride levels increased by 23% on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.
(f) The (good) high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were 11% lower on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.
(g) The (good) Apo A-1 levels were 5% lower on the low fat/high carbohydrate diet compared to the highfat/low carbohydrate diet.

The changes in the above cholesterol levels by the low fat/high carbohydrate diet are associated with an inreased heart disease risk. See here and here.

More information on this subject: Books : Scientific Studies : Websites : Videos : Food Mall 


Recipe of the day

Succulent Bison Roast
                                                                                                                             Food Mall: Bison
Organic Bison Chuck Eye Roast (5.8 pound) by igourmet.comIngredients:
■2 pounds bison tri-tip
■2 tablespoons Herbes de Provence (or other spices of your choice)
■1 teaspoon dried minced garlic (don’t use fresh or it might burn)
■1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
■2 tablespoons oil
■1 white or yellow onion, sliced
■1 each parsnip, turnip and rutabaga, cubed

Instructions:
Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.

Using a knife, carefully slice most of the silver skin off the meat. The silver skin is the thin, white layer covering parts of the roast.

In a small bowl mix together Herbes de Provence, garlic, salt and oil.

Rub the entire roast with the mixture then stick a thermometer into the thickest part of the roast. In a roasting pan, surround the meat with the chopped vegetables. Lightly drizzle the vegetables with oil then put the pan, uncovered, in the oven for 15 minutes.

Reduce oven heat to 300 degrees and cook the meat for approximately 35-45 minutes more, or until the thermometer reaches 140-145 degrees. The meat in the photo, cooked rare, was taken out of the oven at 140 degrees.

Remove the meat from the oven but leave the oven on so the vegetables can continue to cook. Let the meat rest on a cutting board for 15 minutes, uncovered or very lightly covered with foil. Remove the vegetables from the oven, slice the meat thinly, and serve.